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It’s also an awesome list for the single girls and gents who are contemplating relocation. I’m working with the folks at Interracial to create some sort of info graphic or interactive map because we both just love you guys to pieces. Look at the list and feel free to confirm, deny, vehemently debate, agree, disagree, or add your city, county, state or township along with a reason or two why it’s a good place for us to plant some roots.We want to see you healthy and feeling good, and we want to know whether our programs and services are helping you get there. Click here to find out more about how we keep track of how we’re doing and how we use this information.Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! We are an interracial couple (black woman/white man). They seem to be military folks in Fairfax County or transplants who gravitate to Montgomery or Howard County, especially Columbia, MD (known as a mecca of sorts for black/white couples).

For Asians, the gender pattern goes in the opposite direction: Asian women are much more likely than Asian men to marry someone of a different race.

Among newlyweds in 2013, 37% of Asian women married someone who was not Asian, while 16% of Asian men married outside of their race.

American Indians have the highest interracial marriage rate among all single-race groups.

Women are slightly more likely to “marry out” than men in this group: 61% of American Indian female newlyweds married outside their race, compared with 54% of American Indian male newlyweds.

Kim Parker, associate director of the Social & Demographic Trends project, provided valuable comments and suggestions.

Research Assistants Eileen Patten and Seth Motel did the number checking, and Marcia Kramer copy-edited the report.In 2013, a record-high 12% of newlyweds married someone of a different race, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of census data.(This share does not take into account the “interethnic” marriages between Hispanics and non-Hispanics, which we covered in an earlier report on intermarriage.) Looking beyond newlyweds, 6.3% of all marriages were between spouses of different races in 2013, up from less than 1% in 1970.Newlyweds are a subset of the “currently married” population, which includes individuals whose marital status is “married, spouse present.” When comparing characteristics of detailed groups of newlyweds by race/ethnicity as well as gender patterns, only intermarried couples involving a white spouse are analyzed, and they represent about 68% of all intermarried newlywed couples between 20.For illustration purposes, “/” (not specifying gender) and “-” (specifying gender) are used to indicate different types of couples.By Wendy Wang This report analyzes the demographic and economic characteristics of newlyweds who marry spouses of a different race or ethnicity, and compares the traits of those who “marry out” with those who “marry in.” The newlywed pairs are grouped by the race and ethnicity of the husband and wife, and are compared in terms of earnings, education, age of spouse, region of residence and other characteristics.